5.11 Tactical

Allergan and USFRA have partnered to Refresh the eyes of our Law Enforcement and Fire-Rescue heroes! Contact us for more information on how you can score a donation of Refresh Eye Drops for your firehouse or police station. Join the Refresh America program today!!

Profile Add Blog Add Forum Add Event Add Group Add Music Add Photo Add Video

Black Helmet Firefighter Apparel

EXTERNAL LINKS POLICY

PLEASE REVIEW THE USFRA EXTERNAL LINKS POLICY BEFORE SUBMITTING YOUR LINKS.

USFRA is a 501c-3 Professional and Social Network of Firefighters, EMS, Rescue, Law Enforcement, Military and Civilian Support Teams

Start Here!

Already a Member? Sign In.

USFRA Community Central

Welcome center, member introductions and communications center.

More About USFRA.ORG

STANDARD OPERATING GUIDELINES (SOGs)

Page Rank CheckNational Terrorism Advisory System (NTAS) check current status
Protected by Copyscape Online Copyright Protection
Share

usfra.org Webutation

EXTERNAL LINKS POLICY

PLEASE REVIEW THE USFRA EXTERNAL LINKS POLICY BEFORE SUBMITTING YOUR LINKS.

We only provide FREE one way links to IRS confirmed not for profit/charitable and government entities.

Advertising, Sponsor and Affiliate Link Disclosure Policy

Donate & Member Shirts

By supporting the United States First Responders Association, Inc. with your tax deductible donation, you provide the necessary resources to enhance the capabilities of  Police &  Fire Department with access to world-class processes and operational tools as well as help military Veterans and give currently serving heroes the information and tools needed to re-assimilate into civilian life.

The United States First Responders Association, Inc. is an established Florida Non-profit Corporation with a tax exempt status under Section 501 (c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code.  Federal ID # 47-3707493

MEMBER SHIRTS
Show your First Responder Pride by wearing an Official U.S. First Responder T-Shirt.
$25.00
(plus tax & shipping)
A portion of price of this shirt will go towards funding the Bear Care Program for kids. Kids from DV calls or Fire calls get their own Care Bear for comfort and support.

Sizes
USFRA Member Shirt

USFRA Resources

About Us

Created by Fyre Walker Apr 11, 2008 at 6:20am. Last updated by Janet Liebsch Feb 18.

Civilian Fire Safety Links

Created by Fyre Walker Aug 6, 2009 at 4:29pm. Last updated by Capt. D Lewis Aug 18, 2015.

Civilian Health and Wellness

Created by Fyre Walker Mar 10, 2010 at 6:48pm. Last updated by Fyre Walker Oct 24, 2013.

Civilian Kid Fire and Life Safety Links

Created by Fyre Walker Feb 8, 2011 at 12:19pm. Last updated by Allison McCullough Sep 16, 2016.

Civilian Life Safety Links

Created by Fyre Walker Jul 19, 2011 at 12:50am. Last updated by Cam Mitchell Jul 6, 2014.

Council of Advisors

Created by Fyre Walker Aug 24, 2015 at 12:27am. Last updated by Fyre Walker Aug 24, 2015.

EMS Links

Created by Fyre Walker Jul 26, 2009 at 3:07pm. Last updated by Officer Derek Tomlinson May 31, 2016.

EVO - Emergency Vehicle Operations

Created by Cam Mitchell Jan 24, 2013 at 10:38am. Last updated by Cam Mitchell Jan 24, 2013.

FIRE EDUCATION AND TRAINING

Created by Fyre Walker Mar 18, 2009 at 2:32pm. Last updated by Fyre Walker Jan 13, 2013.

Fire Grants

Created by Fyre Walker Mar 21, 2012 at 11:00am. Last updated by Fyre Walker Mar 21, 2012.

Fire Links

Created by Fyre Walker Aug 6, 2009 at 9:22pm. Last updated by Cam Mitchell Sep 29, 2016.

Fire Video News

Created by Fyre Walker Aug 27, 2009 at 6:54am. Last updated by Fyre Walker Aug 27, 2009.

LEO Links

Created by Fyre Walker Aug 31, 2009 at 6:34pm. Last updated by Fyre Walker Mar 11, 2015.

LEO Video News

Created by Fyre Walker Aug 27, 2009 at 6:47am. Last updated by Fyre Walker Aug 27, 2009.

Military Links

Created by Fyre Walker Jun 24, 2009 at 9:49am. Last updated by Allison McCullough Aug 26, 2016.

Our National Partners

A Whole Community Approach to PreparednessIT’S A DISASTER! ...and what are YOU gonna do about it? is a unique customizable disaster preparedness and basic first aid manual for agencies, businesses, volunteers, nonprofits and others to help whole communities prepare for the unexpected.

-----------------------------------------------------

-----------------------------------------------------

---------------------------------------------------

Link Partners & Career Opportunities

In keeping with the overall theme of sharing education and tactical training, here is a list of our networking partners.

Brought to you by:

5.11 Tactical

USFRA FEATURED VIDEOS

  • Add Videos
  • View All

Support Those Who SUpport First Responders!


Buy Bulk Cleaning Supplies, Party Supplies, Glassware And So Much More! Shop DollarTree.com Today!

----------------------------------------------

Clean Effective Delicious, Craving Crusher, Hunger control, get fit

----------------------------------------------

300X250

---------------------------------------------

Paratus 3 Day Bag ---------------------------------------------------
Baumgartner Law Firm
----------------------------------------------------
--------------------------------------------------
Law Offices of Ronald A. Ramos, P.C.
--------------------------------------------------
GlassesUSA.com - 70% Off Retail!
20% OFF All Veteran adn War Caps
Black Helmet Firefighter Tees

JOIN THE USFRA TEAM!

JOIN THE USFRA TEAM!!

Create A Brighter Future. Join In!

Get Involved In Volunteer Projects.

----------------------------------------------

"We Salute You" Merchant Application

USFRA Member Benefits offers a wide variety special discounts for USFRA.org members. The USFRA program offers businesses the opportunity to promote products and services, at no charge to you, by providing special discounts and savings to Public Safety Members. (Fire-Rescue, EMS, Law Enforcement and the U.S. Armed Forces)

Your company or organization can be on the ground floor of this exciting NEW program by completing and submitting this application.

*Incomplete applications will be rejected.

Contact us for more information.

-----------------------------------------------

-----------------------------------------------

---------------------------------------------

Got a news tip or story for USFRA?
Use the link below to submit your story, press releases and news tips.
To submit multiple photos and other documents, please attach them to an email.

Civilian Kid Fire and Life Safety Links

Is your child safe? Prevention is the key. You can find a multitude of information here regarding child safety products and information. If don't don't see what you're looking for, please let us know.

Life Safety

Groups

KID FIRE SAFETY

Kids Fire Safety Worksheets

Right click to save worksheets.

Forum Discussions:

Seasonal Safety

KID FIRE SAFETY ACTIVITIES

Coloring Pages

Lesson Plans: Smoke Alarms

Learning Objectives

  1. Identify the purpose of smoke alarms.
  2. Identify where smoke alarms should be installed.
  3. Identify how to keep smoke alarms in working order.

Materials: Smoke alarm, batteries
Procedure:

  1. Ask students if they know what smoke alarms are and why they should have them in their homes.
    • Smoke alarms help protect families by making a very loud beeping noise to warn that smoke is in the air or a fire has started.
    • Sometimes, especially at night when people are sleeping, they may not see fire, smell smoke or wake up in time to get out safely.
    • Smoke alarms provide an early warning signal for escape from fire.
  2. Demonstrate what a smoke alarm looks like and the sound it makes when it detects smoke.
  3. Ask students what they should do if they hear a smoke alarm sound.
    • They need to follow their home fire escape plan and get out fast.
  4. Ask students if they know where smoke alarms should be installed.
    • Smoke alarms should be installed on every level of the home, including the basement.
    • For extra safety, install smoke alarms both inside and outside the sleeping area.
    • Smoke alarms should be installed on the ceiling or on the side walls 6 to 8 inches below the ceiling.
  5. Ask students how often they think the batteries in smoke alarms should be changed.
    • Batteries should be changed at least once a year and tested monthly to make sure they are working.
  6. Show students where the batteries go in a smoke alarm.
    • Press the test button to demonstrate it is working properly. Also, remind students that alarms need to be kept clean from dust. This can be done by running a vacuum cleaner attachment over and around them.
  7. Conclude the lesson by telling students they can keep their homes safe from fire by helping grown-ups remember to:
    • put smoke alarms in the home, especially near bedrooms
    • test smoke alarms monthly to make sure they are working
    • replace with brand new batteries at least once a year
    • keep smoke alarms clean from dust

Smoke Alarm Safety Check for Parents

Smoke alarms are very easy to install and take care of. To help teach your children about smoke alarms, ask them to help you install and maintain them.

  • Install smoke alarms on every level of your home, including the basement.
  • Many fatal fires begin late at night or in the early morning. For extra safety, install smoke alarms both inside and outside the sleeping area.
  • Also, smoke alarms should be installed on the ceiling or 6 to 8 inches below the ceiling on side walls. Since smoke and many deadly gases rise, installing your smoke alarms at the proper level will provide you with the earliest warning possible.
  • Always follow the manufacturer's installation instructions.
  • Each month, ask your child to help you test all of the alarms in the home. This would also be a good time to make sure your alarms are clean and free of dust.
  • Ask your child to pick at least one special day a year, like a birthday, holiday or other special event. Designate that day as "Smoke Alarm Safety Day" and replace all of the batteries in your smoke alarms with new ones. If your home has "hard-wired" alarms (connected to the household electrical system), they may or may not have battery back-up.

IABPFF No Child Left Alone Campaign

IABPFF Launching No Child Left Alone Fire Safety and Awareness Campaign During Fire Prevention Week, October 3-9, 2010

Campaign targets parents and caregivers of African-American and Spanish-speaking children

The International Association of Black Professional Fire Fighters (IABPFF)has launched the No Child Left Alone fire safety and awareness campaign.  The campaign focuses on informing parents and caregivers of children about the perils of leaving children alone at home, as well as providing life-saving information to make their children “fire-safe.”  According to reports from the U.S. Fire Administration and the National Fire Protection Association, African-American children comprise a large and disproportionate share of total fire deaths nationwide.

IABPFF No Child Left Alone Video

NO CHILD LEFT ALONE Fire Safety Curriculum
Lesson Plan (Ages 4-8 years old)
Fire Fighters Are Your Friends

Fire Safety Discussion Points

Use the following fire safety and prevention information to lead discussions.

Control Kids' Access to Fire

  • Keep all matches and lighters out of the hands of children. If possible, keep these sources of fire in locked drawers. Consider buying only "child-proof" lighters -- but be aware that no product is completely child-proof.
  • Children as young as two years old can strike matches and start fires.
  • Never leave children unattended near operating stoves or burning candles, even for a short time.
  • Teach children not to pick up matches or lighters they may find. Instead, they should tell an adult immediately.

Fire Safety at Home

  • Smoke alarms should be installed on every level of the home, especially near sleeping areas.
  • Smoke alarms should be kept clean of dust by regularly vacuuming over and around them.
  • Replace batteries in smoke alarms at least once a year. And replace the entire unit after ten years of service, or as the manufacturer recommends.
  • Families should plan and practice two escape routes from each room of their home.
  • Regularly inspect the home for fire hazards.
  • If there are adults in the home who smoke, they should use heavy safety ashtrays and discard ashes and butts in metal, sealed containers or the toilet.
  • If there is a fireplace in the home, the entire opening should be covered by a heavy safety screen. The chimney should be professionally inspected and cleaned annually.
  • Children should cook only under the supervision of an adult or with their permission.
  • Children should never play with electrical cords or electrical sockets. They should ask adults for help plugging in equipment.
  • Children should stay away from radiators and heaters, and they should be taught that these devices are not toys. Young children in particular must be taught not to play with or drop anything into space heaters. Nothing should be placed or stored on top of a heater.
  • Pots on stovetops should always have their handles turned toward the center of the stove, where children cannot reach up and pull or knock them off.
  • Teach children to turn off lights, stereos, TVs, and other electrical equipment when they are finished using them. In the case of room heaters, children should ask an adult to turn it off when the room will be empty.
  • Children should never touch matches, lighters, or candles. If they find matches or lighters within reach, they should ask an adult to move them
  • .
  • No one should stand too close to a fireplace or wood stove or other types of heaters, where clothes could easily catch fire.

Warning Signs

  • Evidence of fire play, such as burnt matches, clothes, paper, toys, etc., or if you smell smoke in hair or clothes.
  • Inappropriate interest in firefighters and/or fire trucks, such as frequent, improper calls to the fire department or 9-1-1.
  • Child asks or tries to light cigarettes or candles for you or other adults.
  • Matches or lighters in their pockets or rooms.

Control Curiosity

  • Talk to your child or students in a calm, assured manner about fire safety.
  • Consider visiting a fire station if children are very interested in firefighting and/or fire trucks or ask a firefighter to visit your classroom. Have the firefighter talk about his/her job and the dangers of fire.
  • For parents: Create opportunities for learning about fire safety at home. For example, when you cook, let your child get the pot holder for you; when you use the fireplace, let your child bring you the wood or tools; if you use candles, let the child check to make sure the candle holder fits snugly; and when you change or test the batteries in your smoke alarms, ask the child to help you.

What to Do if You Suspect Your Student/Child Is Playing with Fire?

  • Talk to the child about his or her actions. Explain again that fire is a tool for use only by adults, and that it is very dangerous for children.
  • Many schools, fire departments and law enforcement agencies have programs for children who are inappropriately interested in fire or who have set fires.

Think! Road Safety Education Materials http://think.direct.gov.uk/resource-centre/

The resource centre is a one stop source of THINK! road safety education materials.

  • There are 25 lesson packs that will help you teach a range of road safety topics to children and teenagers of all ages.
  • The lesson packs are colour coded by key stage and age range, from early years to key stage 4.
  • Each lesson pack contains a lesson plan, links to road safety teaching resources, and activities; everything you need to plan and deliver effective road safety education.
  • These resources are not limited to classroom use and we hope that they will be used by anyone with responsibility for educating children and teenagers on road safety, including road safety officers, police and fire officers, out of school leaders, and parents.

If you’re a pupil, you could help your friends and classmates stay safe on the road by using our information and activities in an assembly, tutor time or at a youth group.


Last updated by Allison McCullough Sep 16, 2016.

© 2017   Created by U.S. First Responders Association   Powered by U.S. First Responders Association, Inc.

Powered by USFRA.org - Badge  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service

Live Support